Book Review – Witchslayer’s Scion by L. T. Getty

This book starts with a group of men heading out on a fishing vessel, wistful of escaping from under the oppressive thumb of the Empire. The decision to board a frigate floating dead in the water, its presence given away by the smoke rising from it,  results in the two friends Nisiris and Vared being taken prisoner and forced to fight each other to the death in a sacrificial duel or both be sold as slaves. One will escape.

The story, however, follows another man, Koth, in a humble village far removed from the influence of the Empire, out hunting with his twin brother.

Koth seems an unlikely and imperfect hero, my favorite kind of hero. Not identical twins, he is the lesser of the two brothers in all ways. He knows nothing of the world beyond his small village realm and doesn’t seem to be a very good hunter. His fellow villagers don’t seem to think he’s good at much of anything.

Koth and his brother, Bizen, do have a special ability. They can communicate telepathically with each other. But of the two, only Koth has the ability to heal others.

Koth’s life was decided for him since before he was born, for his ability to heal wounds by touch is rare even among his people. When an attempted kidnapping turns to sacrificial murder, he embraces vengeance and the sword. As he journeys far from his small, isolated village in the north, he learns the truth as to why his bloodline is targeted by strange magic, in a world still rebuilding from a time when dark sorcerers didn’t bother with secrecy.

Koth thinks his quest is straightforward enough: find the men responsible and kill them—and any who aid them. He will soon learn that those who have both privilege and power, there are few things they lack—and in the pursuit of godhood, their allies can prove even more sinister as mere mortals seek to advent empires and dynasties.

Witchslayer’s Scion by L. T. Getty is a third person narrative of events that befall our imperfect hero, Koth, after the murder of his brother and attempted kidnapping of Bizen’s betrothed.

Travelling with his aunt, Una, in the name of vengeance, he will discover the world is much larger and stranger than he imagined, and that revenge isn’t always what you imagine.

While every chapter does not focus on our hero, as new characters emerge to take the center stage, Getty does a good job of using a variety of characters to drive the story forward and introduce new revelations about this world, leading back to Koth’s story.

 For me, Koth’s imperfections and naive failings make him all the more likable as a character.

 If you are into swords and sorcery that lies heavier on the storyline and less focused on the magic itself, you will enjoy L. T. Getty’s Witchslayer’s Scion. This book does not distract from the characters and events of the story with overemphasis on the magic, keeping your attention and focus where it belongs, within this imaginary world.

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